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Ishmael Tarikh was born in the segregated former capitol of the Confederacy. Shortly after birth he and his family moved to Compton, CA. In 1978 he graduated from Alain Locke Senior High School, a school that was founded in the aftermath of the Watts Rebellion of 1965. That summer he was a member of the inaugural class of the Summer Bridge Program  at the University of California, San Diego. After his freshman year of college, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps.

In 1980 Ishmael Tarikh transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles, and immediately began a lifetime of "giving back" through community service. He was conferred a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science in 1983. In 1986 Ishmael was conferred a Master of Arts degree in Afro American Studies from UCLA.

In 2001 Ishmael was conferred a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. While at Hastings Ishmael was active in the Black Law Students Association; he directed basketball intramurals; he sat on the Admissions Committee for the Legal Education Opportunity Program (where he was also a T. A.); he was an instructor in "Street Law"; and he was an intern who was certified to practice law at the San Francisco Public Defender's Office.

Since law school Ishmael has maintained his personal commitment to community service in the capacities as an Instructor for the Center for Youth Development through Law at Boalt Hall; Scorer for Alameda County's Mock Trial Competition; Coach of McClymonds (West Oakland) High School's Mock Trial Team; Interviewer for the Legal Advice and Referral Clinic of the Volunteer Legal Services Program of the Bar Association of San Francisco; and as the Director of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights' Bay Area PoliceWatch. It is as an organizer/activist with EBC that Ishmael co-authored successful legislation [Proposition H, passed by the voters of San Francisco in November, 2003] in San Francisco to hold the San Francisco Police Department more accountable for their excesses. During those advocacy struggles Ishmael appeared frequently in the media of radio, newsprint, and television interviews. His viewpoints on police accountability have been broadcast throughout the nation, and via AP, Reuters, and the Internet, they have been noted worldwide.

Ishmael has taught compulsory public education, community college, and has been academically appointed as a Lecturer at the California State University at Chico, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and San Jose State University. He also taught UC, Berkeley undergraduates for one year in field studies of Urban Education, and has taught at West Valley College, and Foothill College.

Ishmael is an attorney at law who is currently the sole proprietor of Tarikh Consulting Services. His  practice specializes in Immigration Law.  He has been a consultant for the University of San Francisco Law School's Street Law Program; the Boalt Police Review Advocates; the June Jordan Small School for Equity; McClymonds High School Mock Trial Team; Making Waves Education Program; the California State University at Chico; the City of San Francisco's Department of Children, Youth, and Families; Prentice-Hall Publishers; and the Educational Testing Service.  He recently served as a Polling Precinct Inspector for the Alameda County Registrar's Office. He is a member of the American Bar Association, and is a published author.



Welcome to My Website!!!

>Greetings!!! Thank you for visiting my website. Just in case you hadn't heard, we now have a transfer degree in Political Science at De Anza. Details are available at: https://www.deanza.edu/aatastdegrees/degrees.html. Please find listed the latest course(s) that I instruct. I have been a faculty member at De Anza College since 2006. I teach the flagship course entitled American Government and Politics, and I also teach the course entitled Introduction to Political Thought and Theory.


Read on!



DE ANZA COLLEGE CUPERTINO, CA


INSTRUCTOR: I. TARIKH

Office Hours:  MW: 11:30am-12:30pm  Location:  Baldwin Winery Part Time Faculty Offices [Carrel #24]      Phone:  (408) 864-8460

e-mail: tarikhishmael@fhda.edu ;

Website: http://faculty.deanza.fhda.edu/tarikhishmael/



American Government and Politics



COURSE DESCRIPTION

            This is an introductory course.  As such, we will cover a great deal of material, but will not go into the depths that are available to you through more advanced Political Science course offerings.  We will lay the basic foundation for understanding the creation, development, and perpetuation of our fundamental political institutions.  This will be done with an initial focus on our national government, and a subsequent focus on our state government.

            At the outset we will review the historical record of the founding of the American body politic, and will quickly move to a structural (what is the government made of), functional (how does its many parts interact), and practical (what is my role as an individual citizen) analysis.  This course will expose enrolled students to the text of the United States and California State Constitutions; the evolution and interpretations of their texts; constitutional principles; key and current events; and finally, to the prospects and possibilities for a more inclusive and democratic society within the set framework.

            Political Science 1 fulfills the General Education A.A. degree requirement (Social and Behavioral Sciences) for De Anza College; the General Education Breadth requirement for all California State Universities (CSUs); and the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) for all CSUs and UCs.


COURSE OBJECTIVES

            This course is designed for any student who wishes to make a serious study of these issues, and is prepared to do the extensive reading, writing, and research that are course requirements.  However, the most important objective will always be the encouragement and development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

            This course is for four units of academic credit in both traditional, and distance learning formats.  It adheres to all of the dictates of the promulgated De Anza College policies outlined in the Schedule of Classes, and found in the current college catalog.  Of immense importance and emphasis are the policies attendant to Academic Integrity and Academic Freedom.  Strict adherence will be followed.  Please read these passages in the most sober and careful manner.  Unlike much of our contemporaneous society, in this course we will agree, disagree, and agree to disagree while maintaining the decorum befitting a fine institution of higher learning.


ACADEMIC SUPPORT


            The Student Success Center offers individual and group tutoring, as well as several types of workshops.  Students who use our services succeed at much higher rates than those who do not.  As you may know, De Anza now also offers free online tutoring with Smarthinking, available to all students via MyPortal. 

Need help?  Meet with tutors and attend workshops in the  Student Success Center: www.deanza.edu/studentsuccess. 

Can't make it to campus?  Free online tutoring available to all De Anza students.  Just login to MyPortal, go to the Students tab, and find the Smarthinking link.  You can work with a tutor live (hours vary by subject) or post a question or piece of writing for a response.  Smarthinking tutors can also help you with personal statements for transfer!  For more information, go to deanza.edu/studentsuccess/onlinetutoring/


TEACHING METHODOLOGY

            In most cases, the instructor will develop the subjects of the sessions and place them in proper perspective so that a meaningful discussion can follow among the reader, students, and the instructor.  In these discussions, the subject will be viewed from various sides, and a comparison will be made between what the instructor has said and what was written in the required and general references relating to the subject or event.  In this course the student will be required to participate in the discussion forums. The grade the student receives will result from a combination of class participation, quizzes, a midterm examination, a research paper, and a final (in class or take home) examination. Class participation points can be achieved through discourse, and/or community service (up to 100 points).  Research paper topics will be chosen by the students on subjects relating to the field of Political Science, with prior instructor approval.


TEXTS (2 required):

1)          Bardes, Shelley, Schmidt 

American Government and  Politics Today:  The Essentials, with California Politics and Government (Custom Book)      

Cengage Learning                 2014              ISBN 978-1-285-55791-5.

2)          Tarikh, I.

American Government: As It Truly Is

Kendall Hunt Publishing        2013            ISBN 978-1-4652-3202-1.

THESE TEXTS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE DE ANZA COLLEGE BOOKSTORE, AND THROUGH NUMEROUS SOURCES. 

There will also be occasional handouts, videos, and required research.  For all students, in order to receive full G.E. credit each student must score 50% of possible points in every Performance Evaluation/Assessment area.




PROPER PREPARATION PREVENTS POOR PERFORMANCE

                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                        A+ = 950-1000 pts A = 900-949      A- = 875-899
                                                                                        B+ = 850-874         B = 800-849       B- = 775-799
                                                                                        C+ = 750-774         C = 675-749
                                                                                        D+ = 650-674         D = 600-649       D- = 575-599
                                                                                        F = below 575 pts





1)  Participation:  15% = 150 potential points  [this requires verbal contribution to the classroom discourse 50 potential points, and submission of Study Guides 100 potential points; or Agency approved (by Instructor) Community Service for a maximum 100 points, calculated at the rate of 5 points/verified hour]

2)  Quizzes:  60% = 600 potential points [when applicable]

3)  Midterm Examination:  25% = 250 potential points [objective, multiple choice format]

4)  Research Paper:  25% = 250 potential points

5)  Final Examination:  35% = 350 potential points

Some sections have quizzes and a take home final examination.  Some sections have a midterm examination, a research paper, and a final examination.



This Syllabus is subject to change with fair notice.

 







I will not be instructing the following course in Fall Quarter:

 

Introduction to Political Thought and Theory




COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is an introductory course. As such, we will cover a great deal of material, but will not go into the depths that are available to you through more advanced Political Science course offerings. We will survey the field of political theory and review a number of political philosophers. Included will be how to interpret, discuss, critique, debate and write about classical and contemporary thought and theory.

At the outset we will decide who should be included in our survey, including philosophers and theorists from ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary times. This course will expose enrolled students to theories of control and liberation. We will seek guidance from key and current events; and finally, to the prospects and possibilities for a more inclusive and democratic society within the set framework.

Political Science 5 fulfills the General Education A.A. [Area D(2)] degree requirement (Social and Behavioral Sciences) for De Anza College; the General Education History and Society [Area D(8) Political Science, Government and Legal Institutions] Breadth requirement for all California State Universities (CSUs); and the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences (H): Political Science, Government and legal Institutions for all CSUs and UCs.



COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed for any student who wishes to make a serious study of these issues, and is prepared to do the extensive reading, writing, and research that are course requirements. However, the most important objective will always be the encouragement and development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

This course is for four units of academic credit in a lecture format. It adheres to all of the dictates of the promulgated De Anza College policies outlined in the Schedule of Classes, and found in the current college catalog. Of immense importance and emphasis are the policies attendant to Academic Integrity and Academic Freedom. Strict adherence will be followed. Please read these passages in the most sober and careful manner. Unlike much of our contemporaneous society, in this course we will agree, disagree, and agree to disagree while maintaining the decorum befitting a fine institution of higher learning.

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

In most cases, the instructor will develop the subjects of the sessions and place them in proper perspective so that a meaningful discussion can follow among the reader, students, and the instructor. For each class meeting, we will devote the first hour or so to outlining the major contentions of the theorist/philosopher; and devote the second hour or so to intellectually evaluating the thought and theory relative to change or the maintenance of the status quo. In these discussions, the subject will be viewed from various sides, and a comparison will be made between what the instructor has said and what was written in the required and general references relating to the subject or event. In this course the student will be required to participate in the discussion following the formal lecture. Students will also be required to �get in character, and stay in character� during portions of our class meetings. There will also be small group collaborations, and debates. The grade the student receives will result from a combination of class participation, quizzes, a midterm exam, a research paper, and a final exam. Term paper topics will be chosen by the students, but limited to the following approaches:

Individual versus Community Rights

Freedom

Equality and Social Justice

Power and Acquisition

Power and Maintenance

Power and Expansion

Revolution

Reform

Authority and Legitimacy

TEXTS

There are no required texts, but extensive and consistent research.


There will also be occasional handouts, videos, and incessant required research. Your attendance is mandatory in order to receive a passing grade. Supplemental reading and research assignments will be given during lecture.  If you have 2 consecutive unexcused absences, or excessive absences whether consecutive or not, you will be dropped from the class. However, it is your personal responsibility to see to it that you have removed yourself from the Academic Record through the appropriate administrative channels (ie. Admissions and Records). Electronic devices are not allowed in lecture, except with prior instructor or Disabled Student Services approval. There is a zero tolerance policy for using laptops, ipods, ipads, iphones, any other electronic device, and especially for texting during class. The 1st offense is a verbal warning. Repeated offenses will be dealt with through one on one counseling, and ultimately will result in your being dropped from class.  Please mute your cell phones before the beginning of our class sessions � they can be tremendously disruptive.



PERFORMANCE EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

1) Participation = relevant verbal contribution to the discourse of our class meetings

2) Quizzes (10) = 10 minutes, in varying forms (ie. multiple choice, fill-ins, take home, etc.)

3) 3-4 page Research Paper

4) Final Examination

15% = Participation

30% = Quizzes (10 total)

25% = Research Paper

30% = Final Exam

Final Grades will be calculated on a straight grading scale. This means participation is worth 150 points; the quizzes are worth 300 possible points (most items are worth 3 points); the Research Paper is worth 250 possible points; and the Final is worth 300 possible points. The total possible points is 1000.

A+ = 950-1000 pts A = 900-949 A- = 875-899 B+ = 850-874 B = 800-849 B- = 775-799 C+ = 750-774 C = 675-749 D+ = 650-674 D = 600-649 D- = 575-599 F = below 575 pts

I am also available for meeting by appointment.

We will take periodic breaks that are dependent on our progress during class meetings.

Topic(s)

Week 1: Introduction/Syllabus/Overview/Hammurabi/Confucius

Week 2: Sun Tzu/Aristotle/Plato

Week 3: St. Augustine/Machiavelli/Martin Luther/John Calvin

Week 4: Hobbes/Locke/Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab/Rousseau

Week 5: Kant/Smith/Bentham/Ricardo/Mill

Week 6: Kierkegaard/Simon Bolivar/Thoreau/Marx/Engels

Week 7: Nietzsche/Emma Goldman/Marcus Garvey/Gandhi

Week 8: Camus/Marcuse/Sartre

Week 9: Mao Tse Tung/Gramsci/Fanon/Malcolm X

Week 10: Walter Rodney/Mandela/Bobby Seale-Huey Newton/Chomsky

Week 11: Arendt/Rawls/Butler/Ayn Rand

Week 12:  Shklar/Nussbaum/Maurice Bishop


This Syllabus is subject to change with fair notice.









 




Posted by Ishmael Tarikh on 12/22/13; 6:57:52 PM from the dept.

Discuss (6 responses)

 
 Updated Sunday, December 22, 2013 at 6:57:52 PM by Ishmael Tarikh - tarikhishmael@fhda.edu
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